Revisiting UP Baguio and What I Discovered

Incoming freshmen (freshie) of 2014 had no idea that the Oblation’s base was once shrouded with a lush growth of yellow bells.

For most of my college life in Baguio, I had the faintest image of the boulders serving as the base of the monument. All I saw was the green-and-yellow hues of the shrubs.

So when I visited my alma mater one stormy student-less day, I wondered if workers were changing the rocky base of the Oblation as I thought something was different seeing some rocks protruding at the base.

It only occurred to me later that that was the real look of the Oblation–cleared of the yellow bells. Thinking of the Oblations I’ve seen, the Baguio Oblation was unique for employing a biotic base (i.e. the shrubs), totally obscuring the pile of rocks which in itself had a significance to the whole sculptural work. The rocks represent the Philippines as an archipelago, consisting of big and small ones. Shrouding them would obscure the symbolism they depict.

Look closely at the wonderfully stacked base of rocks.

Look closely at the wonderfully stacked rocks, which were donated by the mining community way back in 1962.

A looming view of the Baguio Oblation

A looming view of the Baguio Oblation. This copy of the Oblation was unveiled in 1965. Prof. Anastacio Caedo was commissioned to oversee the cast. Caedo was a model for the original Guillermo Tolentino’s Oblation.

You can compare the “bare” Oblation base to the “clothed” one here.

Meanwhile, here are images of the an oft-forgotten sculpture in UP Baguio–the statue of Inang Laya.

Inang Laya's open arms

Inang Laya’s open arms

Inang Laya seems to run downhill

Inang Laya seems to run downhill. This was made by Napoelon Abueva back in 1964.

Look at her. She wears a short saya (skirt).

As I was a graduate of the College of Arts and Communication of UP Baguio, I am obliged to show some of its building features.

Hall way of the second floor of the CAC building

Hallway of the second floor of the CAC building

At the CAC, fine arts students can make use of the walls as material for their work. And art is everywhere, at some parts literally strewn around.

A mural on one of the walls

A mural on one of the walls

I suppose these are

I suppose these are “death masks” of living models. Perhaps not.

DSC_0148-001

Actually, my batch never got to use the facilities and amenities of the CAC building. It was constructed, I think, years after my batch graduated. Much of our student lives were spent on makeshift rooms, the 20s (read as “two O’s”), and the main administrative building class rooms.

The rear side of the 20s. The top story is the Bulwagang Juan Luna, while the lower ones are the class rooms.

The rear side of the 20s. The top story is the Bulwagang Juan Luna, while the lower ones are the class rooms.

Who could not recognise the image below? I hope the 20s would stand to further serve future students and would not be demolished to give way for a new one. Many memories lurk there. DSC_0175-001 DSC_0262

Finally, other pictures around the campus showing structures the stood the “whims” of time.

One of the kiosks where org members frequent

One of the kiosks where org members frequent

DSC_0239-001

This is called the “Four Pillars”. It stands for the disciplines (or divisions) that UP Baguio excelled at: social sciences; natural sciences and mathematics; humanities; and sports and physical education.

That’s all from me for now.

Some information taken from Analyn Salvador-Amores article “Sculpted Landmarks at UP Baguio“.

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3 thoughts on “Entry 062

  1. I wonder why you love to visit UP campuses too often. I believe it is more than the views, history, and memories. It seems that there is a strong connection between your soul and the places where UP campuses are situated. 🙂 It is like magnet. Whatever it is, I find it worthy for a living soul to explore and find what brings happiness to life. Whether it is by visiting places, conversing with people, or by simply putting oneself away from the nuisance of this world. I am happy that you enjoy what you do. The images captured by your lenses speak to me as if I was there seeing them. And like you, my soul is magnetized by their beauty.

    • I just happened to be in Baguio this past holiday, working on personal papers and documents. It was always imperative for me to visit my school of 4 years. And I always wondered of the developments that transpired there. I would imagine the students waking by the alleyways or would remember my own steps there. If not, the school would become strange to me as something very distant. That is why I update myself with anything to do with it. : p

I'd love to read your thoughts, too. Please leave a reply. ^^

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